Address

Address
Departamental II – DII. 242
Area of Biodiversity and Conservation
Universidad Rey Juan Carlos
c/ Tulipán, s/n.
E-28933 Móstoles (Madrid)
Spain

Phone:
Fax: +34 91 664 7490
E-mail: luisa.amo at urjc.es

Short CV

1999 Degree in Biology, Universidad Complutense de Madrid

2001 Master Tesis, Universidad Complutense de Madrid

2005 PhD in Biology, Universidad Complutense de Madrid

2006 Postdoctoral Researcher, I3P program, National Museum of Natural Sciences (MCNN-CSIC)

2006 – 2008 Postdoctoral Researcher, Ministry of Education and Science postdoctoral fellowship program, Centre for Terrestrial Ecology (NIOO-KWAN), The Netherlands

2008 – 2009 Postdoctoral Researcher, UNAM postdoctoral fellowship program, Institute of Ecology, National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM), Mexico

2009 – 2012 Researcher, Juan de la Cierva Program, Experimental Station of Arid Zones (EEZA-CSIC)

2014 – 2020 Researcher, Ramón y Cajal program, National Museum of Natural Sciences (MNCN-CSIC)

Current position

Lecturer.

I teach one subject in the degree in Experimental Sciences, Biology (3rd course), and one subject in the degree of Biology, Zoology (2nd course).

Research lines

My area of study is focused on Evolutionary Ecology and Behavioral Ecology. I am interested in understanding the role of olfaction in avian life histories. I study how birds use olfaction for coping with selective pressures such as acquiring resources, avoiding predators and social pressures, including sexual selection, for maximizing their fitness. My main lines of research are: antipredatory behavior, foraging ecology, sexual selection, social selection, chemical ecology. Although my main study model is birds, I also work with other vertebrates such as lizards and small mammals.

Scientific publications

SCI journals
47. Saavedra, I.; Amo, L. (2020). The importance chemical, visual and behavioral cues of predators on the antipredatory behavior of birds. Journal of Avian Biology 51: e02431.

46. Saavedra, I.; Amo, L. (2019). Egg concealment is an antipredatory strategy in a cavity nesting bird. Ethology 125: 785–790.

45. Mrazova, A.; Sam, K.; Amo, L. (2019). What do we know about birds’ use of plant volatile cues in tritrophic interactions?. Current Opinion in Insect Science 32: 131–136.

44. Saavedra, I.; Amo, L. (2018). Are birds attracted to methyl-jasmonate-treated trees? Behaviour 155: 945–967.

43. Amo, L.; Tomás, G.; Saavedra, I.; Visser, M. E. (2018). Wild great and blue tits do not avoid chemical cues of predators when selecting cavities for roosting. PLoS ONE 13: e0203269.

42. Amo, L.; Bonadonna, F. (2018). Editorial: The importance of olfaction in intra- and interspecific communication. Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution 6: 71.

41. Saavedra, I.; Amo, L. (2018). Insectivorous birds eavesdrop on the pheromones of their prey. PLoS ONE 13: e0190415.

40. Avilés, J. M.; Amo, L. (2018). The evolution of olfactory capabilities in wild birds: a comparative study. Evolutionary Biology 45: 27-36.

39. Junkers, R. R.; Kuppler, J.; Amo, L.; Blande, D. J.; Borges, R. M.; van Dam, N. M.; Dicke, M.; Dötterl, S.; Ehlers, B. K.; Etl, F.; Gershenzon, J.; Glinwood, R.;  Gols, R.; Groot, A. T.; Heil, M.; Hoffmeister, M.; Holopainen, J. K.; Jarau, S.; Jhon, L.; Kessler, A.; Knudsen, J. T.; Kost, C.; Larue-Kontic, A. A. C.; Leonhardt, S. D.; Lucas-Barbosa, D.; Majetic, C. J.; Menzel, F.; Parachnowitsch, A. M.; Pasquet, R. S.; Poelman, E. H.; Raguso, R. A.; Ruther, J.; Schiestl, F. P.; Schmitt, T.; Tholl, D.; Unsicker, S. B.; Verhulst, N.; Visser, M. E.; Weldegergis, B. T.; Köllner, T. G. (2018). Co-variation and phenotypic integration in chemical communication displays: biosynthetic constraints and ecoevolutionary implications. New Phytologist 220: 739-749.

38. Amo, L.; Tomás, G.; López-García, A. (2017). Role of chemical and visual cues of mammalian predators in nest defense in birds. Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology 71: 49.

37. Amo, L.; Dicke, M.; Visser, M. E. (2016). Are naïve birds attracted to herbivore-induced plant defences? Behaviour 153: 353-366.

36. Nielsen, B. L.; Jezierski, T.; Bolhuis, L.; Amo, L.; Rosell, F. N.; Oostindjer, M.; Christensen, J. W.; McKeegan, D.; Wells, D. L.; Hepper, P. (2015). Olfaction: an overlooked sensory modality in applied ethology and animal welfare. Frontiers in Veterinary Science 2: 69.

35. Amo, L.; López-Rull, I.; Pagán, I.; Macías Garcia, C. (2015). Evidence that the house finch (Carpodacus mexicanus) uses scent to avoid omnivore mammals. Revista Chilena de Historia Natural 88: 5.

34. Amo, L.; Tomás, G.; Parejo, D.; Avilés, J. M. (2014). Are female starlings able to recognize the scent of their offspring? PLoS ONE 9: e109505.

33. Amo, L.; Jansen, J. J.; van Dam, N. M.; Dicke, M.; Visser, M. E. (2013). Birds exploit herbivore-induced plant volatiles to locate herbivorous prey. Ecology Letters 16: 1348–1355.

32. Amo, L.; Rodríguez-Gironés, M. A.; Barbosa, A. (2013). Olfactory detection of dimethyl sulphide in a krill-eating Antarctic penguin. Marine Ecology Progress Series 474: 277–285.

31. Amo, L.; López-Rull, I.; Pagán, I.; Macías Garcia, C. (2012). Male quality and conspecific scent preferences in the house finch Carpodacus mexicanus. Animal Behaviour 84: 1483-1489.

30. Parejo, D.; Amo, L.; Rodríguez, J.; Avilés, J. M. (2012). Rollers smell the fear of nestlings. Biology Letters 8: 502-504.

29. Amo, L.; Avilés, J. M.; Parejo, D.; Peña, A.; Rodríguez, J.; Tomás, G. (2012). Sex recognition by odour and variation in the uropygial gland secretion in starlings. Journal of Animal Ecology 81: 605-613.

28. Amo, L.; Caro, S. P.; Visser, M. E. (2011). Sleeping birds do not respond to predator odour. PLoS ONE 6: e27576.

27. Amo, L.; Visser, M. E.; van Oers, K. (2011). Smelling out predators is innate in birds. Ardea 99: 177-184.

26. Galván, I.; Amo, L.; Sanz, J. J. (2008). Ultraviolet-blue reflectance of some nestling plumage patches mediates parental favouritism in tits. Journal of Avian Biology 39: 277-282.

25. Amo, L.; Galván, I.; Tomás, G.; Sanz, J. J. (2008). Predator odour recognition and avoidance in a songbird. Functional Ecology 22: 289–293.

24. Martín, J.; Amo, L.; López, P. (2008). Parasites and health affect multiple sexual signals of male common wall lizards. Naturwissenschaften 95: 293–300.

23. Martín, J.; Civantos, E.; Amo, L.; López, P. (2007). Chemical ornaments of male lizards Psammodromus algirus may reveal their parasite load and health state to females. Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology 62: 173–179.

22. Amo, L.; López, P.; Martín, J. (2007). Natural oak forest vs. ancient pine plantations: lizard microhabitat use may explain the effects of ancient reforestations on distribution and conservation of Iberian lizards. Biodiversity and Conservation 16: 3409–3422.

21. Amo, L.; López, P.; Martín, J. (2007). Habitat deterioration affects antipredatory behavior, body condition, and parasite load of female Psammodromus algirus lizards. Canadian Journal of Zoology 85: 743–751.

20. Amo, L.; López, P.; Martín, J. (2007). Refuge use: a conflict between avoiding predation and losing mass in lizards. Physiology and Behavior 90: 334–343.

19. Amo, L.; López, P.; Martín, J. (2007). Pregnant female lizards Lacerta monticola adjust refuge use to decrease thermal costs for their body condition and t-cell mediated immune response. Journal of Experimental Zoology A 307: 106–112.

18. Amo, L.; López, P.; Martín, J. (2007). Habitat deterioration affects body condition of lizards: A behavioral approach with Iberolacerta cyreni lizards inhabiting ski resorts. Biological Conservation 135: 77–85.

17. Amo, L.; López, P.; Martín, J. (2006). Nature-based tourism as a form of predation risk affects body condition and health state of Podarcis muralis lizards. Biological Conservation 131: 402–409.

16. López, P.; Amo, L.; Martín J. (2006). Reliable signaling by chemical cues of male traits and health state in male lizards, Lacerta monticola. Journal of Chemical Ecology 32: 473-488.

15. Amo, L.; López, P.; Martín, J. (2006). Can wall lizards combine chemical and visual cues to discriminate predatory from non-predatory snakes inside refuges?. Ethology 112: 478–484.

14. Amo, L.; Fargallo, J. A.; Martínez-Padilla J.; Millán, J.; López, P.; Martín, J. (2005). Prevalence and intensity of blood and intestinal parasites in a field population of a Mediterranean lizard, Lacerta lepida. Parasitology Research 96: 413-417.

13. Amo, L.; López, P.; Martín, J. (2005). Prevalence and intensity of haemogregarine blood parasites and their mite vectors in the common wall lizard, Podarcis muralis. Parasitology Research 96: 378-381.

12. Amo, L.; López, P.; Martín, J. (2005). Flexibility in antipredatory behavior allows wall lizards to cope with multiple types of predators. Annales Zoologici Fennici 42: 109-121.

11. Amo, L.; López, P.; Martín, J. (2005). Chemical assessment of predation risk in the wall lizard, Podarcis muralis, is influenced by time exposed to chemical cues of ambush snakes. Herpetological Journal 15: 21-25.

10. López, P.; Hawlena, D.; Polo, V.; Amo, L.; Martín, J. (2005). Sources of individual shy–bold variations in antipredator behaviour of male Iberian rock lizards. Animal Behaviour 69: 1–9.

9. Jovani, R.; Amo, L.; Arriero, E.; Krone, O.; Marzal, A.; Shurulinkov, P.; Tomás, G.; Sol, D.; Hagen, J.; López, P.; Martín, J.; Navarro, C.; Torres, J. (2004). Double gametocyte infections in apicomplexan parasites of birds and reptiles. Parasitology Research 94: 155-157.

8. Amo, L.; López, P.; Martín, J. (2004). Prevalence and intensity of haemogregarinid blood parasites in a population of the Iberian rock lizard, Lacerta monticola. Parasitology Research 94: 290-293.

7. Amo, L.; López, P.; Martín, J. (2004). Chemosensory recognition of its lizard prey by the ambush smooth snake, Coronella austriaca. Journal of Herpetology 38: 451-454.

6. Amo, L.; López, P.; Martín, J. (2004). Thermal dependence of chemical assessment of predation risk by snakes affects the ability of wall lizards, Podarcis muralis, to avoid unsafe refuges. Physiology and Behavior 82: 913-918.

5. Amo, L.; López, P.; Martín, J. (2004). Trade-offs in the choice of refuges by wall lizards: do thermal costs affect preferences for predator-free refuges? Canadian Journal of Zoology 82: 897-901.

4. Amo, L.; López, P.; Martín, J. (2004). Chemosensory recognition and behavioral responses of wall lizards, Podarcis muralis, to scents of snakes that pose different risks of predation. Copeia 2004: 691-696.

3. Amo, L.; López, P.; Martín, J. (2004). Multiple predators and conflicting refuge use in the wall lizard, Podarcis muralis. Annales Zoologici Fennici 41: 671-679.

2. Amo, L.; López, P.; Martín, J. (2004). Wall lizards combine chemical and visual cues of ambush snake predators to avoid overestimating risk inside refuges. Animal Behaviour 67: 647-653.

1. Amo, L.; López, P.; Martín, J. (2003). Risk level and thermal costs affect the choice of escape strategy and refuge use in the wall lizard, Podarcis muralis. Copeia 2003: 899-905.

Book chapters

Amo, L. (2017). The role of olfaction in mate selection and reproductive behaviour. In: Nielsen, B. (ed) Olfaction in animal behaviour and welfare: 85-101. CABI Publishers, Wallingford.

Amo, L.; Jansen, J. J.; van Dam, N. M.; Dicke, M.; Visser, M. E. (2016). Studying the role of VOCs in multitrophic relationships. In: Thermal desorption applications guide: biological profiling. Markes International, Llantrisant.

Amo, L.; López, P.; Martín, J. (2010). El olor de la muerte: lagartijas contra culebras. In: Carranza, J.; Moreno, J; Soler, M. (eds.) Estudios sobre comportamiento animal: XXV años de la Sociedad Española de Etología (1984-2009): 93-98. Universidad de Extremadura, Cáceres.

Amo, L.; López, P.; Martín, J. (2008). Natural oak forest vs. ancient pine plantations: lizard microhabitat use may explain the effects of ancient reforestations on distribution and conservation of Iberian lizards. In: Biodiversity and Conservation in Europe Vol 7: 167-180. Springer, Netherlands.